Divorce, what about the house?

If the couple lives for rent, the solution in case of divorce is very simple, obviously without the emotional trauma that can cause. But if the property in which the couple lives is owned, the situation is complicated. If there are children in addition to these difficulties, they rise to the maximum power.

The future of housing depends on whether the couple lives in a state that applies the principle of property separation or one that applies the principle of matrimonial property. During marriage, these classifications may seem trivial, but in the unfortunate cases of divorce, these details become very important.

States applying the principle of separation of goods

Most states apply the principle of separation of assets. The term “separation of property” is simply a term used to determine ownership of marital property (property acquired during marriage). The property separation system states that properties acquired by a member of a married couple belong entirely and exclusively to that person. Of course, if the title or deed of ownership of a property are put in the name of both spouses, that property belongs to both. If the names of both spouses are included in the property title of the property, they each own half of the interest.

Not all properties have a title or script. In this case, it is generally up to the person who paid the property or received it as a gift.

States applying the principle of matrimonial property

States applying the marital property principle are Louisiana, Arizona, California, Texas, Washington, Idaho, Nevada, New Mexico, and Wisconsin. These states apply the principle that all properties acquired during marriage are considered “marital property.” Marriage assets in these states are owned by both spouses equally (50/50). These marital assets include gains, all property purchased with those gains and all debts incurred during the marriage. Marriage assets begin when the marriage is established and end when the couple physically separates with the intention of not continuing the marriage. Therefore, any gain or debt that arises after this time will be considered individual property.

If you are going through a divorce and need to sell your home as soon as possible to continue with your life, contact us at +1 305 766 3775 phone and we will offer you the best price for your home.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

property in which the couple lives is owned, the situation is complicated. If there are children in addition to these difficulties, they rise to the maximum power.

The future of housing depends on whether the couple lives in a state that applies the principle of property separation or one that applies the principle of matrimonial property. During marriage, these classifications may seem trivial, but in the unfortunate cases of divorce, these details become very important.

States applying the principle of separation of goods

Most states apply the principle of separation of assets. The term “separation of property” is simply a term used to determine ownership of marital property (property acquired during marriage). The property separation system states that properties acquired by a member of a married couple belong entirely and exclusively to that person. Of course, if the title or deed of ownership of a property are put in the name of both spouses, that property belongs to both. If the names of both spouses are included in the property title of the property, they each own half of the interest.

Not all properties have a title or script. In this case, it is generally up to the person who paid the property or received it as a gift.

States applying the principle of matrimonial property

States applying the marital property principle are Louisiana, Arizona, California, Texas, Washington, Idaho, Nevada, New Mexico, and Wisconsin. These states apply the principle that all properties acquired during marriage are considered “marital property.” Marriage assets in these states are owned by both spouses equally (50/50). These marital assets include gains, all property purchased with those gains and all debts incurred during the marriage. Marriage assets begin when the marriage is established and end when the couple physically separates with the intention of not continuing the marriage. Therefore, any gain or debt that arises after this time will be considered individual property.

 

If you are going through a divorce and need to sell your home as soon as possible to continue with your life, contact us at + phone and we will offer you the best price for your home.

Divorce, what about the house?
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